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Definition:

Skilled workers are people who may become permanent residents based on their ability to become economically established in Canada.

Minimum requirement

For your application to be considered, you must meet the minimum requirement of at least one year of full-time (or full-time equivalent), paid work experience. This experience must:

- have occurred in the past 10 years

- be in Skill Type 0 or Skill Level A or B of the National Occupation Classification (NOC).

The National Occupation Classification (NOC)

The NOC is a classification system of occupations in Canada. It describes the duties, skills, aptitudes and work settings typical of jobs in the Canadian labour market.

Determining your NOC category

Follow these steps to determine if your work experience is in an occupation that meets the minimum requirement to apply as a skilled worker:

STEP 1. Go to page http://soscanada2000.com/migration/newact/skill/occu/skillevl/occlist.html

STEP 2. See if your work experience qualifies you to immigrate under the Skilled Worker class.

STEP 3. If you have experience in more than one occupation during the past 10 years, repeat the search to determine if you meet the minimum requirement to apply as a skilled worker. Work experience in several occupations may also be used, if it adds up to one full year.

STEP 4. Check the list of restricted occupations. If your work experience is in a restricted occupation, then it cannot be used to earn points to qualify for the skilled worker class. (At the time of printing there were no restricted occupations in Canada; however, you should check our Web site to see the current list.)

You are not eligible to apply as a skilled worker if:

- none of your work experience is listed in Skill Type 0 or Skill Level A or B of the NOC;

- your experience did not occur within 10 years of the date of application

- your eligible work experience does not add up to one full year; or

- your only work experience is in a restricted occupation.

Selection system

If your work experience meets the minimum requirements to apply as a skilled worker, your application will be assessed against two criteria:

1. Required funds

2. Selection factors

Disclosure of funds

You will have to tell a Canadian official if you carry more than $10,000 Canadian in cash funds upon your entry to Canada. This could be in the form of:

- money (coins or bank notes)

- securities in bearer form (stocks, bonds, debentures, treasury bills etc.)

- negotiable instruments in bearer form (bankers' drafts, cheques, travellers' cheques, money orders etc.)

Failure to disclose can result in fines and imprisonment.

How to estimate your points

Read the explanation for each factor, then fill in your score on the worksheet.

If you have a spouse or common-law partner, you must decide which of you will be the principal applicant; the other person will be considered a family member. Use the self-assessment worksheet to determine which of you would score the most points. This person should be the principal applicant.

Note: A common-law partner is a person of the same or opposite sex who has lived with you in a conjugal relationship for a period of at least one year.

A family member is a spouse, common-law partner or dependent child included in your application.

FACTOR 1: EDUCATION (MAXIMUM 25 POINTS)

Points are awarded for earned educational credentials as well as the number of years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. To be awarded points, you must meet both stated criteria. See page: http://soscanada2000.com/migration/newact/skill/poingrid.html for details.

Note: Full-time studies: At least 15 hours of instruction per week during the academic year. This includes any period of workplace training that forms part of the course.

Full-time equivalent studies: If you completed a program of study on a part-time or accelerated basis, count the length of time it would have taken to complete the program on a full-time basis.

Instructions

If you have not completed the number of years of study that correspond to your highest educational credential, award yourself points based on the number of years of study.

Examples: If you have a Master's degree but have completed only 16 years of full-time study, award yourself 22 points. If you have a four-year Bachelor's degree and have completed 14 or more years of study, award yourself 20 points.

FACTOR 2: LANGUAGE ABILITY (MAXIMUM 24 POINTS)

Points are awarded for proven ability in reading, writing, listening to and speaking English and/or French. See page: http://soscanada2000.com/migration/newact/skill/langpro.html for details.

Instructions

STEP 1. If you have some abilities in both English and French, decide which of the two you are more comfortable using; this will be considered your first official language. The other will be your second official language.

STEP 2. Determine your points according to your ability to read, write, listen to, and speak these languages using the criteria in the Canadian Language Benchmarks.

LANGUAGE ABILITY DOCUMENTATION

If you decide to apply to immigrate Canada as a skilled worker, you must provide conclusive proof of your language abilities. There are two ways to provide this proof. Choose one of the options below to establish your proficiency in English and/or French.

Option 1: take a language proficiency test

It is strongly recommended that you take a language test from an approved organization if you are claiming proficiency in a language that is not your native language. Language test results remain valid for one year.

Option 2: provide supporting documentation

If you believe that a language test is not necessary, you may establish your proficiency levels through a written explanation and supporting documentation. Your explanation and documents must clearly show that you meet the reading, writing, listening to and speaking criteria for the proficiency levels you are claiming in English and French, as they are listed in the Canadian Language Benchmarks.

Arranging a language test

If you choose Option 1, you must arrange a language test from any of the approved organizations. For contact information, refer to page: http://soscanada2000.com/migration/newact/skill/langpro.html

Steps:

1 Make arrangements for testing and pay test costs.

2 Submit the assessment results with your immigration application.

Results:

- Test results will be used as conclusive evidence of your language proficiency.

- You will know exactly how many points you will receive for the language factor before you submit your application. To determine your points, see the test result equivalency charts that follow.

Steps:

1 Gather material that supports your claim. This should include:

- A submission written by you that details your training in, and use of, English and/or French

- Official documentation of education in English and/or French

- Official documentation of work experience in English and/or French

2 Submit these documents with your immigration application. It is your responsibility to submit all documents; we will not contact you if information is missing.

Results:

- We will not interview you to assess your proficiency levels.

- If we are not satisfied of your claimed proficiency level, we may make our own assessment based on the information you submit. Your application may be refused if this results in a shortage of points.

- you will not know exactly how many points you will receive for the language factor until after we have assessed your application.

English language testing organizations:

The University of Cambridge Local Examination Syndicate, Education Australia, and the British Council administer the International English Language Testing System (IELTS).

Note: IELTS has "General Training" and "Academic" options for the reading and writing tests. If you choose to take an IELTS test, you must take the "General Training" option.

The University of British Columbia's Applied Research and Evaluation Services (ARES) administer the Canadian International Language Proficiency Index Program (CELPIP).

French language testing organizations:

The Paris Chamber of Commerce and Industry administers the Test de-valuation de Francais (TEF).

Note: For immigration purposes, you must submit results for the following tests:

- expression orale

- comprehension orale

- comprehension crite

- expression crite

FACTOR 3: WORK EXPERIENCE (MAXIMUM 21 POINTS)

Calculate your points by adding all of the years of full-time, paid work experience you have that:

- Occurred within the past 10 years

- Is not listed as a restricted occupation

- Occurred in occupations listed in Skill Type 0 or Skill Level A or B of the NOC

For points calculation, please see page: http://soscanada2000.com/migration/newact/skill/poingrid.html

FACTOR 4: AGE (MAXIMUM 10 POINTS)

Points are given for your age at the time your application is received. See page: http://www.soscanada2000.com/migration/newact/skill/poingrid.html for details.

FACTOR 5: ARRANGED EMPLOYMENT (MAXIMUM 10 POINTS)

If: You are currently working in Canada on a temporary work permit (including sectoral confirmations). And:

- Your work permit is valid for 12 or more months after the date you apply for a permanent resident visa;

- Your employer has made an offer to give you a permanent job if your application is successful.          10

If: You are currently working in Canada in a job that is HRDC confirmation-exempt under an international agreement or a significant benefit category (e.g. intra-company transferee). And:

- Your work permit is valid for 12 or more months after the date you apply for a permanent resident visa;

- Your employer has made an offer to give you a permanent job if your application is successful.        10

If: You do not currently have a work permit and you do not intend to work in Canada before you have been issued a permanent resident visa. And:

- You have a full-time job offer that has been confirmed by Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC);

- Your employer has made an offer to give you a permanent job if your application is successful.

- You meet all required Canadian licensing or regulatory standards associated with the job.

Note:

- You cannot arrange for an HRDC confirmation. Your employer must do this.

- HRDC will confirm job offers for occupations listed in Skill Type 0 or Skill Level A or B of the NOC.          10

FACTOR 6: ADAPTABILITY (MAXIMUM 10 POINTS)

Points are awarded for certain adaptability elements based on the experience of the principal applicant and/or his or her spouse or common-law partner.

Instructions:

If you have a spouse or common-law partner, points for each element can be awarded only once, either for you or your spouse or common-law partner.

Adaptability criteria Points

A. Spouse or common-law partner's level of education

- Secondary school (high school) diploma or less: 0 points

- A one-year diploma, trade certificate, apprenticeship, or university degree and at least 12 years of full-time or full-time equivalent studies: 3 points

- A diploma, trade certificate, apprenticeship, or university degree of two years or more and at least 14 years of full-time or full-time equivalent studies: 4 points

- A Master's or PhD and at least 17 years of full-time or full-time equivalent studies: 5 points

B. Previous study in Canada:

- You or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner studied at a post-secondary institution in Canada for at least two years on a full-time basis. This must have been done after the age of 17 and with a valid study permit. 5 points

C. Previous work in Canada:

- You or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner completed a minimum of one year of full-time work in Canada on a valid work permit. 5 points

D. Arranged employment:

- You earned points under Factor 5: Arranged Employment. 5 points

E. Relatives in Canada:

- You or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner has a relative (parent, grandparent, child, grandchild, child of a parent, sibling, child of a grandparent, aunt/uncle, or grandchild of a parent, niece or nephew) who lives in Canada and is a Canadian citizen or permanent resident. 5 points

The pass mark:

The pass marks is 67 out of 100.

If: Your total score is equal to or greater than the pass mark...

Then:

You may qualify for immigration to Canada as a skilled worker. Read the rest of this guide to decide if you wish to apply under the Federal Skilled Worker Class.

If: Your total score is less than the pass mark...

Then:

- You are not likely to qualify for immigration to Canada as a skilled worker. We recommend that you do not apply at this time;

- However, you may apply if you believe there are other factors that would help you to become economically established in Canada. Send a detailed letter with your application explaining these factors. Include any documents that support your claim.

Working in Canada:

Finding employment in Canada requires planning. You should obtain as much information as possible before you apply to immigrate. There is no guarantee that you will be able to work in your preferred occupation.

Although credential assessment and licensing are not requirements of the skilled worker application, you need to be aware of these issues when considering immigrating to Canada.

Regulated occupations

Twenty percent of people working in Canada work in occupations that are regulated to protect the health and safety of Canadians. Examples include nurses, engineers, electricians and teachers.

Provincial and territorial regulatory bodies are responsible for establishing entry requirements for individual occupations; for recognizing prior credentials, training and experience; and for issuing licences required to practice. The recognition process varies between provinces and territories and between occupations.

Recognition of qualifications and issuance of licenses can generally only be completed once in Canada. The process can take time. You may be asked to:

- provide documentation of qualifications

- undergo a language examination (which may differ from those required for immigration)

- complete a technical exam (with accompanying fee)

- do supervised work

Non-regulated occupations

For non-regulated occupations, there are no set requirements and there is no legal requirement to obtain a licence. The employer will set the standards and may very well request registration with a professional association.

Credential assessment

A credential assessment is advice on how qualifications from another country compare to Canadian qualifications. An assessment does not guarantee that:

- a regulatory body will issue you a licence to practice

- your credentials will be accepted by a Canadian employer

However, a credential assessment will help you understand the Canadian educational system and assist you with your job search.

You can have your credentials assessed by one of the provincial evaluation services.

Labour market information

Job opportunities and labour market conditions are different in each region of Canada. It is important to research conditions in the area in which you want to live. Follow the 'Working in Canada' link on our Web site for helpful sites on the Canadian labour market, job banks, and provincial and territorial labour market information.

MEDICAL REQUIREMENTS:

You and your family members, whether accompanying you or not, must undergo and pass a medical examination in order to come to Canada. To pass the medical examination you or your family members must not have a condition that:

- is a danger to public health or safety

- would cause excessive demand on health or social services in Canada. Examples of "excessive demand" include ongoing hospitalization or institutional care for a physical or mental illness.

Instructions

Instructions on how to undergo the medical examination will normally be sent to you after you submit your application to the visa office.

Exam validity

The medical examination results are valid for 12 months from the date of the first medical examination. If you are not admitted as a permanent resident during this time, you must undergo another complete medical examination.

Authorized doctors

Your own doctor cannot do the medical examination. You must see a physician on Canada's list of Panel Doctors. Note that the physician is only responsible for conducting a medical examination; he or she cannot give you any advice on the immigration process.

SECURITY REQUIREMENTS:

Police certificates and clearances

You and your family members must provide us with a police certificate issued by the authorities of each country in which you have lived for six (6) months or more since reaching the age of 18. Certificates must be originals and issued within the last three months.

If you have been convicted of a criminal offence in Canada, your application cannot be approved unless you receive a pardon. To avoid the unnecessary payment of processing fees for an immigration application that will be refused, you should first apply for a pardon to the:

Clemency and Pardons Division
National Parole Board
410 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, ON, Canada
K1A 0R1
Fax: 1-613-941-4981

Web site: www.npb-cnlc.gc.ca (application forms can be downloaded from the site)


 
 

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